Bill Nye is having NONE of your shit lady.

(via arise-exist-expire)

Two souls are sometimes created together and in love before they’re born. — F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Beautiful and Damned (via larmoyante)

(via w-a-r-e-h-o-u-s-e)

Dorm room aquarium set up today. 6 species of plants and 2 species of fish. 20+ guppies and two Siamese algae eaters.  It’ll be a couple weeks before the plants start to flourish but at that point it may actually start to look nice

Dorm room aquarium set up today. 6 species of plants and 2 species of fish. 20+ guppies and two Siamese algae eaters. It’ll be a couple weeks before the plants start to flourish but at that point it may actually start to look nice

Talked to my roommate about aquaponics and he got so inspired that he tried to get me to tell everyone else

dynamicoceans:

Eyeless Mexican tetra fish lose their circadian metabolic rhythms when they live in dark caves, but surface-dwelling varieties of the same species, which retain the capacity for sight, continue to respond to light and dark cycles.
They found that in constant darkness, circadian rhythms in surface fish increased their metabolic rate and oxygen consumption during the “subjective daytime,” during which the animals used 38 percent more energy than blind cavefish. When in their natural day/light cycles, the lack of a circadian rhythm helped cave fish use 27 percent less energy than the surface fish that ramped up their metabolism in the light. The loss of daily metabolic rhythms may be an energy-efficient adaptation to life in the dark, the authors suggested.
The cave-adapted fish also show a heightened reliance on taste and feel to find food or navigate and are better benthic foragers. The adaptations are important to survival: cave fish washed to the surface are more vulnerable to predators, while surface-dwellers swept underground by flooding rivers struggle to find food.
Source

dynamicoceans:

Eyeless Mexican tetra fish lose their circadian metabolic rhythms when they live in dark caves, but surface-dwelling varieties of the same species, which retain the capacity for sight, continue to respond to light and dark cycles.

They found that in constant darkness, circadian rhythms in surface fish increased their metabolic rate and oxygen consumption during the “subjective daytime,” during which the animals used 38 percent more energy than blind cavefish. When in their natural day/light cycles, the lack of a circadian rhythm helped cave fish use 27 percent less energy than the surface fish that ramped up their metabolism in the light. The loss of daily metabolic rhythms may be an energy-efficient adaptation to life in the dark, the authors suggested.

The cave-adapted fish also show a heightened reliance on taste and feel to find food or navigate and are better benthic foragers. The adaptations are important to survival: cave fish washed to the surface are more vulnerable to predators, while surface-dwellers swept underground by flooding rivers struggle to find food.

Source

mothernaturenetwork:

Could bacteria from honeybees replace antibiotics?Bacteria discovered in the honey stomachs of bees can heal persistent wounds and beat antibiotic-resistant ‘superbugs,’ a new study shows, generating buzz about their potential use in medicine.

mothernaturenetwork:

Could bacteria from honeybees replace antibiotics?
Bacteria discovered in the honey stomachs of bees can heal persistent wounds and beat antibiotic-resistant ‘superbugs,’ a new study shows, generating buzz about their potential use in medicine.

I only want you. — Midnight thoughts (wish you were here)

(via ouiballerina)

Today I went to a greenhouse and explored and they had lots of cacti and also some pretty orchids. Can’t wait until this is my life.