Us Bellevue boys rocking that daily runescape high scores…

Us Bellevue boys rocking that daily runescape high scores…

Wouldn’t it be weird if we referred to the people who actually discover and invent things on this earth as our gods?

oupacademic:

Atmospheric CO₂ levels have increased by almost 40% in the last 250 years, and the world’s oceans have absorbed more than 30% of this extra CO₂. This increase in seawater CO₂ and subsequent reduction in pH – known as ocean acidification – poses a serious threat to marine organisms and ecosystems.
However, new research has shown that the epaulette shark has proved itself to be remarkably resilient to a changing environment.
Read the recently published article in Conservation Physiology, revealing the physiological adjustments this shark is making to cope with elevated CO₂ levels and survive in a radically altered natural habitat.
Image: Epaulette shark, image courtesy of M. Heupel. Do not reproduce without permission.

oupacademic:

Atmospheric CO₂ levels have increased by almost 40% in the last 250 years, and the world’s oceans have absorbed more than 30% of this extra CO₂. This increase in seawater CO₂ and subsequent reduction in pH – known as ocean acidification – poses a serious threat to marine organisms and ecosystems.

However, new research has shown that the epaulette shark has proved itself to be remarkably resilient to a changing environment.

Read the recently published article in Conservation Physiology, revealing the physiological adjustments this shark is making to cope with elevated CO₂ levels and survive in a radically altered natural habitat.

Image: Epaulette shark, image courtesy of M. Heupel. Do not reproduce without permission.

earthstory:

Wind erosionA really cool find in the deserts of Northern Africa. Wind is a major erosive force, capable of picking up and carrying sand grains, but the wind is limited. Most winds are easily able to pick up sand, but pebbles are usually too big for the wind to move.This photo is about 4 cm across. There are small pebbles sitting on top of sand; the wind can move the sand but not the pebbles. The pebbles have protected the sand grains below them, creating pillars of sand beneath the pebbles. These would be called deflation features; remnants of sand being removed by the wind.-JBBImage credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/banco_imagenes_geologicas/8558090382

earthstory:

Wind erosion

A really cool find in the deserts of Northern Africa. Wind is a major erosive force, capable of picking up and carrying sand grains, but the wind is limited. Most winds are easily able to pick up sand, but pebbles are usually too big for the wind to move.

This photo is about 4 cm across. There are small pebbles sitting on top of sand; the wind can move the sand but not the pebbles. The pebbles have protected the sand grains below them, creating pillars of sand beneath the pebbles. These would be called deflation features; remnants of sand being removed by the wind.

-JBB

Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/banco_imagenes_geologicas/8558090382

Humans like to think of themselves as special. But science has a way of puncturing their illusions. The potential impacts of intelligent machines on human life in The Economist. (via oupacademic)
rhamphotheca:

What Causes Brazil’s ‘Meeting of the Waters’?
by Bec Crew
This is what it looks like when the Solimões River meets the Rio Negro in Brazil.
Almost 10 kilometres from the inland city of Manaus in northern Brazil, ‘the Meeting of the Waters’ is the point where two of Amazon River’s largest tributaries - a smaller river that flows into a bigger ‘parent’ river - converge but never mix.
The Solimões River forms the lighter half, its ‘cafe au lait’ colouring owed to the rich sediment that runs down from the Andes Mountains, including sand, mud and silt. Known as a ‘white water river’, the Solimões River stretches over a 1600 km distance. 
The darker side is the Rio Negro, and it gets its ‘black tea’ hue from leaf and plant matter that has decayed and dissolved in the water. It might look dark and murky, but the Rio Negro carries little or no sediment, and according to the European Space Agency website, is considered one of the cleanest natural waters in the world. On really clear days, water visibility in this black water river can exceed nine metres. ..
(read more: Science Alert - Australia)
Image: Danocoo1/Reddit.com

rhamphotheca:

What Causes Brazil’s ‘Meeting of the Waters’?

by Bec Crew

This is what it looks like when the Solimões River meets the Rio Negro in Brazil.

Almost 10 kilometres from the inland city of Manaus in northern Brazil, ‘the Meeting of the Waters’ is the point where two of Amazon River’s largest tributaries - a smaller river that flows into a bigger ‘parent’ river - converge but never mix.

The Solimões River forms the lighter half, its ‘cafe au lait’ colouring owed to the rich sediment that runs down from the Andes Mountains, including sand, mud and silt. Known as a ‘white water river’, the Solimões River stretches over a 1600 km distance. 

The darker side is the Rio Negro, and it gets its ‘black tea’ hue from leaf and plant matter that has decayed and dissolved in the water. It might look dark and murky, but the Rio Negro carries little or no sediment, and according to the European Space Agency website, is considered one of the cleanest natural waters in the world. On really clear days, water visibility in this black water river can exceed nine metres. ..

(read more: Science Alert - Australia)

Image: Danocoo1/Reddit.com

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo
The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.
Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?
(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo

The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.

Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?

(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

"I am the one that fell from there down to the ground and with his broken wings ruled the world all around."